DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Standard Six: Professional Knowledge and Growth

 

Meeting Standard Six:

In face-to-face debriefings, journal writing, and formal self-analysis, the student teacher demonstrates the positive acceptance of feedback and makes a thoughtful response to it. Classroom planning and implementation demonstrates that the student teacher has internalized and is making use of feedback. Beyond the classroom, the student teacher avails her/himself of professional publications, conferences, and workshops to improve his/her practice and to develop the habits necessary for continued professional growth.

 

Self-Reflection: Meeting and Exceeding Professional Knowledge and Growth

One of my favorite parts of Brown’s MAT program that prepares me to be a teacher is its emphasis on self-assessment and reflection. I feel proud to say that I have been trained to be critically self-aware of my teaching practices, lesson plans, relationships with students, and relationships with colleagues. Each day I write a reflection of my Lesson Plan—I am constantly formulating new goals based on what worked well and what didn’t work well in my classroom. In debriefings with my mentor teacher, I take notes of suggestions and try to enact changes in my very next lesson. For both of my classes, I keep “Daily Assessment” sheets that evaluate student attendance, tardiness, completion of daily activities, homework, and behavior. This system allows me to evaluate my teaching by keeping track of student progress. I am also committed to discussing my practices with other members of the MAT program; I believe this is a practice I will continue throughout my career. Collaborating with other teachers—observing them and having them observe me—is a practice that also allows me to focus on my ongoing growth as an educator. As a beginning teacher, I am committed to professional development. I attended Rhode Island College's Writer Project Conference, which featured Linda Christensen, and also attended Brown University's No Teacher Left Behind Conference. Both experiences were extremely helpful to me and have inspired me to always think about opportunities for professional development throughout my career.

 

Artifacts:

Midterm Self-Assessment.Siemer.doc

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During my student-teaching semester, I had the opportunity to take a course offered from the Education Alliance at Brown University. The course was entitled, “Educational Leadership in Diverse Settings.” I was a wonderful privilege to take the course, sitting amongst experienced teachers from the Providence area. This artifact is a reflection of my leadership style and also on the leadership style of my mentor at Hope High School.

Leadership in Diverse Settings_Reflection on Leadership Mentor.doc

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Artifact: NTLB II!!!

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
User-uploaded Content
DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

Artifact:  No Teacher Left Behind Conference II (NTLB II)

During the Fall Semester of 2007, I applied for and received the RITER (Rhode Island Teacher Education Renewal Project) Fellowship.  As the RITER fellow, I assisted the planning of the second annual conference that was held in March.  It was wonderful assisting director, Meg Springer.  My responsibilities included assisting with the advertisement of the conference, the selection of presenters for the conference, and the beginning organization of methods for registration and the conference schedule.  Helping with the organization of the conference was a great learning experience; it was a privilege sitting with the Education Department to plan a successful conference!  It is my hope to be involved with other professional development opportunities such as my work with NTLB. 

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.