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As with all things in life, there doesn’t seem to be a lone contributing factor to dating and marriage patterns among Asian Americans. Intermarriage rates are clearly on the rise, and there are many possible reasons for it, both positive and negative. On the positive side, American society as a whole seems to becoming more accepting of interracial relationships. These unions will most likely foster a whole new generation of multiracial Americans, such that “race” will no longer be an easy categorization. The theory of propiniquity suggests that the rise in intermarriage rates is simply a matter of greater numbers of Asian Americans becoming assimilated and in high contact with non-Asians. On the other hand, there are still negative pressures. The negative media portrayals of Asian males as asexual and inadequate continue to divide people by color. There are still cultural clashes and class differences that force people to limit their pool of potential spouses. But what should these marriage statistics look like? Should any given American be equally likely to marry any race, or can race sometimes be a valid consideration? There are many answers to this question, but I think making decisions according to race excludes oneself as well as others.  My vote is for unity.

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.
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DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.